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10th Air Force hosts annual Combat Planning Council

Several dozen Air Force Reserve officers participate in the final session of the annual Combat Planning Council, at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 9. The CPC brings all 17 Air Force Reserve units within the 10th Air Force together for several days, allowing them to align efforts, goals and strategic plans face-to-face.

Several dozen Air Force Reserve officers participate in the final session of the annual Combat Planning Council, at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 9. The CPC brings all 17 Air Force Reserve units within the 10th Air Force together for several days, allowing them to align efforts, goals and strategic plans face-to-face.

Representatives from around the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard listen in during the final session of the Combat Planning Council, at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 7-9. The conference-style event featured a wide variety of topics including equipment, manning and training. Leaders from each unit reported to working groups according to their specialties and mission sets.

Representatives from around the Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard listen in during the final session of the Combat Planning Council, at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 7-9. The conference-style event featured a wide variety of topics including equipment, manning and training. Leaders from each unit reported to working groups according to their specialties and mission sets.

The 10th Air Force headquarters building located at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 8, 2019. The mission of the Tenth Air Force is to organize, train and equip mission-ready Reserve Citizen Airmen, showcasing how they enable our units to fly, fight and win in air, space and cyberspace.

The 10th Air Force headquarters building located at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 8, 2019. The mission of the Tenth Air Force is to organize, train and equip mission-ready Reserve Citizen Airmen, showcasing how they enable our units to fly, fight and win in air, space and cyberspace.

Maj. Gen. Brian K. Borgen, 10th Air Force Commander, addresses a crowd during the final session of the Combat Planning Council, at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 9. Borgen, who recently assumed command of the 10th Air Force will use the information gathered during the three-day conference to develop strategic plans for the units under his command.

Maj. Gen. Brian K. Borgen, 10th Air Force Commander, addresses a crowd during the final session of the Combat Planning Council, at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 9. Borgen, who recently assumed command of the 10th Air Force will use the information gathered during the three-day conference to develop strategic plans for the units under his command.

NAVAL AIR STATION FORT WORTH JOINT RESERVE BASE, Texas --

The 10th Air Force hosted its annual Combat Planning Council at Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas, May 7-9.
The CPC brings all 17 Air Force Reserve units within the 10th Air Force together for several days, allowing them to align efforts, goals and strategic plans face-to-face.
The conference-style event featured a wide variety of topics including equipment, manning and training. Leaders from each unit reported to working groups according to their specialties and mission sets.
“We talk about the things that give us better combat capabilities,” said Col. Michael V. Loforti, 920th Operations Group Commander. “This is one of the rare occasions where we can get our tactical warfighters from around the 10th Air Force together to build important relationships and network.”
Lt. Col. Joe Romeo, HH-60 Director of Test, Air National Guard Air Force Reserve Command Test Center, said the council helped him collect valuable information directly from Airmen on the front lines, who use much of the technology his team develops. Romeo elaborated, stating the feedback helps his team with testing and modernization efforts.
“It’s been very effective for aligning our priorities,” said Romeo. “We are reuniting and reviewing what we’ve learned at past CPCs so that we can apply those lessons.”
Naturally, funding and asset management were also key components of working group discussions; with commanders educating leadership on high-priority items needed for their respective units.
Commander of the 8th Space Warning Squadron, Lt. Col. Heather Cohea, said training systems are at the top of her list because they need to replace aging systems currently in use.
“We are conveying the importance of what our unit needs to enhance our mission capabilities,” said Cohea.
According to Cohea, the CPC is a chance for commanders to collaborate on some of the Air Force Reserve’s common challenges.
“Its really great to meet with experts from different mission areas,” said Cohea. “We can work together to find common issues and common solutions, which helps guarantee our effectiveness.”
Working groups ranked their findings and needs by importance, before presenting them to 10th Air Force Commander, Maj. Gen. Brian K. Borgen, at the end of the week. Borgen will work closely with staff to procure and allocate funding for various objectives presented during the final session.   
“This is where the rubber meets the road for the mission,” said Borgen during his closing remarks. “It is absolutely critical to have these types of meetings every year. Having an open and honest dialogue allows us to focus on what we need to do to move forward as a modern force.”
The mission of the 10th Air Force is to organize, train and equip mission-ready Reserve Citizen Airmen, showcasing how they enable our units to fly, fight and win in air, space and cyberspace.